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If Hearing Loss is Not Treated, Brain Can ‘Forget’ How to Hear and Understand Speech, Says Expert

If Hearing Loss is Not Treated, Brain Can ‘Forget’ How to Hear and Understand Speech, Says Expert

Most of the 28 million Americans living with untreated hearing loss may be unaware that failure to take corrective action could result in the brain actually “forgetting” how to hear and understand speech, according to audiologist Cindy Beyer, AuD, senior VP, HearUSA, West Palm Beach, Fla. “When the brain is insufficiently stimulated by sound over a period of time, it can lose a portion of its ability to process information,” said Beyer in a statement released by the company. “This condition is called auditory deprivation, and studies indicate that the longer a...

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Untreated Hearing Loss and Depression in Adults

Untreated Hearing Loss and Depression in Adults

Mr. Smith suffers from “isolation, inactivity, lack of enjoyment and negative thinking.” His wife complains that lately he “speaks less” and “with more silences.” He “takes longer to respond to the remarks of others,” and his face is “relatively devoid of animation.” He “gestures” infrequently, and when he does communicate, she says he is “likely to express negative feelings.” Recently, he has been “hostile and demanding.” Sound familiar? Does Mr. Smith sound to you like he might have a significant hearing problem? He could, but these descriptions are cited by...

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June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

In honor of Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month we wanted to share Better Hearing Institute’s list of 7 health concerns that illustrate how hearing loss is linked to a number of health issues–many of which involve brain function. 1. Cognition: Studies from Brandeis University show that unaddressed hearing loss interferes with a person’s ability to accurately process and make sense of auditory information. People with hearing loss don’t perform as well on cognitive tests as people with good hearing. 2. Dementia: Researchers a

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Hearing Aids Improve Hearing–and A LOT More

By Søren Hougaard, MA; Stefan Ruf, MA; Christian Egger, MA, and Harvey Abrams, PhD The authors describe the methodology associated with the world’s largest consumer market surveys on hearing aids and hearing loss, and report their findings with a focus on the “non-auditory benefits” of hearing aids, including quality of life, relationships at home and work, sense of safety and independence, and mental health. In 2009, the European Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (EHIMA) initiated EuroTrak (ET) in an attempt to better understand the nature of  hearing impairment, as well...

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Study Shows That Hearing Aids Improve Brain Function.

According to a recent study by Jamie Desjardins, PhD, an assistant professor in the speech-language pathology program at The University of Texas at El Paso, hearing aids improve brain function in people with hearing loss. It is known that hearing loss, if left untreated, can lead to emotional and social consequences, reduced job performance, and diminished quality of life. Recently, research has shown that untreated hearing loss also can interfere with cognitive abilities because so much mental effort is diverted toward understanding speech. Jamie Desjardins, PhD “If you have some...

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Studies Reveal Consequences of Untreated Partial Hearing Loss

Studies Reveal Consequences of Untreated Partial Hearing Loss

Reuters Health reports on a research review which revealed that leaving childhood partial deafness untreated has long term consequences. According to the recent review, it’s just as important to identify and treat newborns and young children with hearing loss in only one ear, or else prospects for hearing recovery may be diminished. In the online article that appeared in Pediatrics, a review of several hearing loss studies found that single-sided deafness that is left untreated leads to reorganization of developing hearing pathways in the brain, and has been tied to poorer language...

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